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Innovations & Inventions






Planning their honeymoon.

 

A day at the beach.

 

Having dinner out with your friends.

 

Out on an intimate date.

 

mime-attachment-5.jpg

Having a conversation with your bestie.

 

A visit to the museum.


 

It's here!

SBIR Road Tour Comes to Phoenix on May 5th

April 10-17

http://www.industrytap.com/newsletter

http://www.industrytap.com/newsletter

Chicago — Long a manufacturer of plastic-intensive coolers and related outdoor products, Igloo Products Corp. is entering a new product category with its launch of personal beverage bottles.

Igloo's personal hydration line, launched at the 2017 International Home and Housewares Show in Chicago, features bottles in a variety of materials, including Eastman's Tritan copolyester, polypropylene and stainless steel. They're designed to address consumer demand for different styles of drinkware for different activities — one bottle for yoga class and another to take to the office, for example — said Lisa Hayashi, brand marketing director. The line comprises six product types, ranging from a Tritan bottle with a brightly-colored silicone grip to a stainless steel tumbler with a Tritan lid.

In January 2015 Igloo announced it had acquired Cool Gear International LLC, a manufacturer of personal hydration and food storage products. The acquisition came just nine months after Igloo was itself acquired by private equity firm ACON Investments of Washington D.C. At the time, executives noted the brands' complementary product offerings and Cool Gear's significant intellectual property.

"Igloo brings fresh capital, broader distribution and other resources to Cool Gear, which will help us continue to penetrate new markets and categories with product extensions and additional innovations," Donna Roth, co-founder of Cool Gear, said in a statement.

Also on display at IHHS was a 2.5-gallon metal beverage dispenser created to celebrate Igloo's 70th anniversary. The dispenser's stainless steel exterior echoes the design of Igloo's first galvanized water cooler developed in 1947, and the interior is lined with polyethylene with a removable plastic infuser basket.

March 27-April 3

http://www.industrytap.com/newsletter

Technique capable of detecting influenza infection after the patient breathes for only a few minutes into the container.

The ionized droplets carrying the virus are attracted to an electrically-grounded droplet of liquid in the bottom of the chamber.

KTH The Royal Institute of Technology03.29.17

A method for diagnosing flu virus from breath samples could soon replace invasive nasal swabs and deliver better results faster.
 
There’s a short window for detecting influenza virus, because as the infection takes hold—the concentration of the virus lessens. So if the patient isn’t tested soon after exposure, conventional methods run the risk of a giving a false negative result.
 
A new method under development at KTH Royal Institute of Technology in Sweden however could provide sensitive detection of the virus, much faster than the nasal swabbing tests used today.
 
All it takes is for patients to breathe into a bottle.
 
The EU-funded project is two-fold, and results were published this month in PLOS One and American Chemical Society. Led by KTH Professor Wouter van der Wijngaart, a research team from KTH—in collaboration with the University of Antwerp, the University of Leuven, and Janssen Diagnostics—first successfully tested a system for collecting virus particles from patients’ breath, in vitro and in pre-clinical studies. In a parallel effort, the researchers have developed a method for identifying the influenza virus’ nuclear proteins.

The new technique is capable of detecting influenza infection after the patient breathes for only a few minutes into the container, said Laila Ladhani (pictured), Ph.D. student in Micro and Nanosystems at KTH.

van der Wijngaart describes the “femtoliter well array biosensor” as a configuration of tens of thousands of wells, each smaller than the size of a single red blood cell, that capture the proteins. This part of the EU-funded project has proven successful in singling out non-virus molecules, but van der Wijngaart said development will continue for some time.
 
“Now we have proven that the two crucial technologies work, independently from one another,” said Laila Ladhani, Ph.D. student at KTH.
 
The recent results show that the technique would be capable of detecting influenza infection after the patient breathes for only a few minutes into the container. Highly-charged needles inside the bottle ionize the micro-sized droplets of water that carry the virus in the breath, and these are then attracted to an electrically-grounded droplet of liquid in the bottom of the chamber.
 
The next step is to break open the virus cell’s walls, using the common lab process of lysis, and then hunt down the nuclear proteins of the virus. The scientists, which include Gaspard Pardon and KTH PhD student Reza Shafagh, mix the proteins in a fluid with magnetic antibody-coated beads that the proteins bind to.
 
The beads are flushed into the well array and when a magnet is placed underneath the array, the proteins become fluorescent, which makes them easy to detect with a camera.
 
“This kind of test will enable doctors to treat severely threatened patients the right way, and it will be valuable for use in clinical research,” Van Der Wijngaart said. “It’s harder than finding a needle in a haystack, but it can be done.”

Google Car Fleet to Analyze Methane Leaks

http://www.realclearlife.com/foodanddrink/physicist-hates-oreo-cream-filling-much-invented-machine-remove/

Feb 24-Mar 13

http://www.industrytap.com/newsletter

http://www.industrytap.com/newsletter

http://www.industrytap.com/newsletter

Feb 13-20

http://www.industrytap.com/newsletter

https://phys.org/news/2017-02-battery-recharged-carbon-dioxide.html

http://www.industrytap.com/newsletter

Feb 6-13

http://www.industrytap.com/newsletter

Jan 30-Feb 6

http://www.industrytap.com/newsletter

http://www.industrytap.com/newsletter

https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2017-01-30/how-to-build-a-watch-classes-and-techniqu

Jan 30-Feb 6

http://www.industrytap.com/newsletter

https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2017-01-30/how-to-build-a-watch-classes-and-technique

Week of February 1

http://www.industrytap.com

http://www.industrytap.com/newsletter

Jan. 16 - Jan. 23

http://www.industrytap.com/newsletter

Jan. 9

Harvey. (Credit: The University of Nottingham)

Medicinal Properties

The medicinal properties of spider silk have been recognized for centuries but not clearly understood. The Greeks and Romans treated wounded soldiers with spider webs to stop bleeding. It is said that soldiers would use a combination of honey and vinegar to clean deep wounds and then cover the whole thing with balled-up spider webs.

There is even a mention in Shakespeare’s Midsummer Night's Dream: “I shall desire you of more acquaintance, good master cobweb,” the character ‘Bottom’ said. “If I cut my finger, I shall make bold of you.”

‘I Think We Could Make That!’

The idea came together at a discipline bridging university ‘sandpit’ meeting five years ago. Goodacre says her chance meeting at that event with Thomas proved to be one of the most productive afternoons of her career.

Goodacre, who heads up the SpiderLab in the School of Life Sciences, said: “I got up at that meeting and showed the audience a picture of some spider silk. I said ‘I want to understand how this silk works, and then make some.’ At the end of the session Neil came up to me and said ‘I think my group could make that.’ He also suggested that there might be more interesting ‘tweaks’ one could make so that the silk could be ‘decorated’ with different, useful, compounds either permanently or which could be released over time due to a change in the acidity of the environment.”

The approach required the production of the silk proteins in a bacterium where an amino acid not normally found in proteins was included. This amino acid contained an azide group which is widely used in ‘click’ reactions that only occur at that position in the protein. It was an approach that no-one had used before with spider silk — but the big question was — would it work?

Goodacre said: “It was the start of a fascinating adventure that saw a postdoc undertake a very preliminary study to construct the synthetic silks. He was a former SpiderLab Ph.D. student who had previously worked with our tarantulas. Thanks to his ground work we showed we could produce the silk proteins in bacteria. We were then joined by David Harvey, a new Ph.D. student, who not only made the silk fibers, incorporating the unusual amino acid, but also decorated it and demonstrated its antibiotic activity. He has since extended those first ideas far beyond what we had thought might be possible.”

Harvey’s work is described in the paper, but Thomas and Goodacre say this is just the start. There are other joint SpiderLab/Thomas lab students working on uses for this technology in the hope of developing it further. Harvey, the lead author on their first paper, has just been awarded his Ph.D. and is now a postdoctoral researcher on a BBSRC follow-on grant so is still at the heart of the research. His current work is focused on driving the functionalized spider silk technology towards commercial application in wound

Harvey. (Credit: The University of Nottingham)

Medicinal Properties

The medicinal properties of spider silk have been recognized for centuries but not clearly understood. The Greeks and Romans treated wounded soldiers with spider webs to stop bleeding. It is said that soldiers would use a combination of honey and vinegar to clean deep wounds and then cover the whole thing with balled-up spider webs.

There is even a mention in Shakespeare’s Midsummer Night's Dream: “I shall desire you of more acquaintance, good master cobweb,” the character ‘Bottom’ said. “If I cut my finger, I shall make bold of you.”

The idea came together at a discipline bridging university ‘sandpit’ meeting five years ago. Goodacre says her chance meeting at that event with Thomas proved to be one of the most productive afternoons of her career.

Goodacre, who heads up the SpiderLab in the School of Life Sciences, said: “I got up at that meeting and showed the audience a picture of some spider silk. I said ‘I want to understand how this silk works, and then make some.’ At the end of the session Neil came up to me and said ‘I think my group could make that.’ He also suggested that there might be more interesting ‘tweaks’ one could make so that the silk could be ‘decorated’ with different, useful, compounds either permanently or which could be released over time due to a change in the acidity of the environment.”

The approach required the production of the silk proteins in a bacterium where an amino acid not normally found in proteins was included. This amino acid contained an azide group which is widely used in ‘click’ reactions that only occur at that position in the protein. It was an approach that no-one had used before with spider silk — but the big question was — would it work?

Goodacre said: “It was the start of a fascinating adventure that saw a postdoc undertake a very preliminary study to construct the synthetic silks. He was a former SpiderLab Ph.D. student who had previously worked with our tarantulas. Thanks to his ground work we showed we could produce the silk proteins in bacteria. We were then joined by David Harvey, a new Ph.D. student, who not only made the silk fibers, incorporating the unusual amino acid, but also decorated it and demonstrated its antibiotic activity. He has since extended those first ideas far beyond what we had thought might be possible.”

Harvey’s work is described in the paper, but Thomas and Goodacre say this is just the start. There are other joint SpiderLab/Thomas lab students working on uses for this technology in the hope of developing it further. Harvey, the lead author on their first paper, has just been awarded his Ph.D. and is now a postdoctoral researcher on a BBSRC follow-on grant so is still at the heart of the research. His current work is focused on driving the functionalized spider silk technology towards commercial application in wound

 

Inspired by a Whirligig Toy, Stanford Bioengineers Develop a 20-Cent, Hand-Powered Blood Centrifuge

Tue, 01/10/2017 - 1:42pm

by Kris Newby, Stanford University

Here’s how to build a whirligig: Thread a loop of twine through two holes in a button. Grab the loop ends, then rhythmically pull. As the twine coils and uncoils, the button spins at a dizzying speed.

Now, using the same mechanical principles, Stanford bioengineers have created an ultra-low-cost, human-powered centrifuge that separates blood into its individual components in only 1.5 minutes. Built from 20 cents of paper, twine and plastic, a “paperfuge” can spin at speeds of 125,000 rpm and exert centrifugal forces of 30,000 Gs.

“To the best of my knowledge, it’s the fastest spinning object driven by human power,” said Manu Prakash, an assistant professor of bioengineering at Stanford.

A centrifuge is critical for detecting diseases such as malaria, African sleeping sickness, HIV and tuberculosis. This low-cost version will enable precise diagnosis and treatment in the poor, off-the-grid regions where these diseases are most prevalent.

The physics and test results of this device are published in the Jan. 10 issue of Nature Biomedical Engineering.

No electricity required

When used for disease testing, a centrifuge separates blood components and makes pathogens easier to detect. A typical centrifuge spins fluid samples inside an electric-powered, rotating drum. As the drum spins, centrifugal forces separate fluids by density into layers within a sample tube. In the case of blood, heavy red cells collect at the bottom of the tube, watery plasma floats to the top, and parasites, like those that cause malaria, settle in the middle.

Prakash, who specializes in low-cost diagnostic tools for underserved regions, recognized the need for a new type of centrifuge after he saw an expensive centrifuge being used as a doorstop in a rural clinic in Uganda because there was no electricity to run it.

“There are more than a billion people around the world who have no infrastructure, no roads, no electricity. I realized that if we wanted to solve a critical problem like malaria diagnosis, we needed to design a human-powered centrifuge that costs less than a cup of coffee,” said Prakash, who was senior author on the study.

Inspired by spinning toys, Prakash began brainstorming design ideas with Saad Bhamla, a postdoctoral research fellow in his lab and first author on the paper. After weeks of exploring ways to convert human energy into spinning forces, they began focusing on toys invented before the industrial age – yo-yos, tops and whirligigs.

“One night I was playing with a button and string, and out of curiosity, I set up a high-speed camera to see how fast a button whirligig would spin. I couldn’t believe my eyes,” said Bhamla, when he discovered that the whirring button was rotating at 10,000 to 15,000 rpms.

After two weeks of prototyping, he mounted a capillary of blood on a paper-disc whirligig and was able to centrifuge blood into layers. It was a definitive proof-of-concept, but before he went to the next step in the design process, he and Prakash decided to tackle a scientific question no one else had: How does a whirligig actually work?

170110-Stanford device.JPG

Inspired by a toy, Stanford bioengineers have developed an inexpensive, human-powered blood centrifuge that will enable precise diagnosis and treatment of diseases like malaria, African sleeping sickness and tuberculosis in the poor, off-the-grid regions where these diseases are most prevalent. (Credit: Stanford University)

The other string theory

Bhamla recruited three undergraduate engineering students from MIT and Stanford to build a mathematical model of how the devices work. The team created a computer simulation to capture design variables like disc size, string elasticity and pulling force. They also borrowed equations from the physics of supercoiling DNA strands to understand how hand-forces move from the coiling strings to power the spinning disc.

“There are some beautiful mathematics hidden inside this object,” Prakash said.

Once the engineers validated their models against real-world prototype performance, they were able to create a prototype with rotational speeds of up to 125,000 rpm, a magnitude significantly higher than their first prototypes.

“From a technical spec point of view, we can match centrifuges that cost from $1,000 to $5,000,” said Prakash.

In parallel, they improved the device’s safety and began testing configurations that could be used to test live parasites in the field. From lab-based trials, they found that malaria parasites could be separated from red blood cells in 15 minutes. And by spinning the sample in a capillary precoated with acridine orange dye, glowing malaria parasites could be identified by simply placing the capillary under a microscope.

Bhamla and Prakash, who recently returned from fieldwork in Madagascar, are currently conducting a paperfuge field validation trial for malaria diagnostics with PIVOT and Institut Pasteur, community-health collaborators based in Madagascar.

A frugal science toolbox

Paperfuge is the third invention from the Prakash lab driven by a frugal design philosophy, where engineers rethink traditional medical tools to lower costs and bring scientific capabilities out of the lab and into hands of health care workers in resource-poor areas.

The first was the foldscope, a fully functional, under-a-dollar paper microscope that can be used for diagnosing blood-borne diseases such as malaria, African sleeping sickness and Chagas. To date there are 50,000 foldscopes in the hands of people around the world, and a spinoff company recently launched a Kickstarter campaign to ship 1 million more.

The second was a $5 programmable kid’s chemistry set, inspired by hand-crank music boxes, which enables the execution of precise chemical assays in the field.

Prakash’s dream is that these tools will enable health workers, field ecologists and children in the most remote areas of the world to carry a complete laboratory in a backpack.

“Frugal science is about democratizing scientific tools to get them out to people around the world,” said Prakash.

 

Dec 30-Jan 16

http://www.industrytap.com

3D Print PDF File

Science Daily

Forensic News Daily

December 5 - January 16

http://www.industrytap.com/newsletter

STARTUP TUCSON

https://www.inventables.com/technologies/carvey

Purple Platypus

https://3dprint.com/11001/mec-nex-3d-printer-k-nex/

December 12-19

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This is a COTS for parts: http://www.traceparts.com//
It lets an inventor download the needed part as designed by a multitude of manufacturers.
This lets an inventor integrate the part into his drawings.

Inventions yellowbox Dec 2-12

http://www.industrytap.com/newsletter

Nov. 21 - Dec. 5

START UP TUCSON

CHECK THIS LINK OUT!

http://www.industrytap.com/newsletter

Nov. 21-28

http://www.industrytap.com/newsletter

Nov. 14-21

http://www.industrytap.com/newsletter

Lincoln Electric Co

http://www.lincolnelectric.com

Invest in Startups

Nov. 7 - 14

http://www.industrytap.com/newsletter

Students should continue working in the directions suggested in today's Project Evaluation exercise. 

October 31 - November 7

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http://www.industrytap.com/newsletter

http://www.goldmine-elec-products.com

ReWalk Robotics (NSDQ:RWLK) last week priced a stock-and-warrants offering worth more than $12 million and said it expects its 3rd-quarter earnings to beat expectations on Wall Street.

Yokneam, Israel- and Marlborough, Mass.-based ReWalk, which makes a robotic exoskeleton designed to assist patients with spinal cord injuries, said it floated 3.25 million units at $3.75 apiece in the offering, for gross proceeds of $12.2 million. The offering includes a share of RWLK stock and ¾ of a warrant at an exercise price of $4.75 apiece. Oppenheimer & Co., the lone underwriter, has a 30-day over-allotment option for another 487,500 units that’s worth an additional $1.8 million.

ReWalk said it plans to use the proceeds for general corporate purposes, “including supporting its ongoing sales, marketing and reimbursement efforts to grow its business and funding research and development activities focused on product development.”

In a separate release, the company said it expects to post sales of $1.4 million for the 3 months ended Sept. 30, ahead of the consensus estimate on The Street of $1.3 million. Analysts there are looking for losses per share of -59¢. ReWalk is slated to release its full 3rd-quarter results Nov. 3.

ReWalk said it sold 23 exoskeletons during the quarter, including 13 that were covered by insurance, and had about $12.4 million in cash and equivalents on hand at the end of the period.

RWLK shares closed down -7.8% at $2.95 apiece Oct. 28.

http://www.kdcapital.com

http://www.industrytap.com/newsletter

October 24-31

http://www.industrytap.com/newsletter - 2

http://www.industrytap.com/newsletter

go.protolabs.com/AT6A

October 17-24

Students should review their notes on manufacturing methods.

www.indiegogo.com/explore/technology

STARTUP Tucson Events

INDUSTRYTap

http://www.silabs.com/products/wireless/Pages/thunderboard-sense-kit.aspx

www.industrytap.com

HyperBranch Medical Wins Decision Against Integra Lifesciences

Thu, 10/13/2016 - 4:21pm

by Business Wire

 

(Credit: HyperBranch Medical Technology)

HyperBranch Medical Technology, Inc. announced today that it has defeated a motion by Integra LifeSciences to preliminarily enjoin HyperBranch from selling its Adherus AutoSpray Dural Sealant product. The Court’s opinion relied, in part, on evidence that “unquestionably shows that (1) [Integra’s] DuraSeal’s applicator was associated with significant problems; [and] (2) the [Adherus] AutoSpray product’s applicator did not have such problems.”

HyperBranch began selling Adherus AutoSpray Dural Sealant in the United States in July 2015 after receiving FDA approval. In September 2015, Integra sued HyperBranch for alleged patent infringement in the U.S. District Court for the District of Delaware. Integra also filed a motion seeking a preliminary injunction to prevent HyperBranch from selling Adherus AutoSpray Dural Sealant during the pendency of the lawsuit. On September 29, 2016, Chief Judge Leonard P. Stark adopted the Report and Recommendation of Magistrate Judge Christopher J. Burke and denied Integra’s motion.

Rejecting Integra’s argument that it would suffer irreparable harm as a result of HyperBranch’s alleged patent infringement, the Court found:

[T]he record is replete with compelling evidence that the AutoSpray product is an attractive choice over DuraSeal due to a feature that undisputedly has nothing to do with the asserted patents—its applicator . . . . This evidence unquestionably shows that: (1) DuraSeal’s applicator was associated with significant problems; (2) the AutoSpray product’s applicator did not have such problems; and (3) this would be an important reason (perhaps the primary reason) why physicians and hospitals would choose the AutoSpray product over the DuraSeal product.

The Court also found that the public interest favors keeping Adherus AutoSpray Dural Sealant on the market during the pendency of the litigation. Citing testimony from three neurosurgeons with a combined 93+ years of experience, who “each expresse[d] a clear preference for the AutoSpray product,” along with documents from Integra (and its predecessor-in-interest, Covidien) that were “rife with references to the AutoSpray product’s improved applicator [and] to unresolved problems with DuraSeal,” the Court provided its rationale:

(1) there are only two FDA-approved dural sealant products for cranial procedures that are available in the United States market-Integra’s product and HyperBranch’s product; (2) the products’ use has a real effect on the health of patients who have undergone serious surgical procedures; (3) the record indicates that at least some number of physicians prefer HyperBranch’s product to Integra’s product (and does not contain much, if any, evidence regarding surgeons who prefer the DuraSeal product over the AutoSpray product); and (4) the record suggests that the DuraSeal product has deficiencies that the AutoSpray product does not suffer from.

The lawsuit will continue, with a trial scheduled to begin on April 16, 2018. In responding to the complaint, HyperBranch has denied Integra’s infringement allegations, asserted various defenses, including invalidity of the patents at issue, and requested an award of its attorneys’ fees and other litigation costs. HyperBranch intends to continue to defend itself vigorously against Integra’s claims and is confident that it will prevail on the merits.

http://emailing.traceparts.com/partners/3DX/2016/160928/September_2016_Exchange_TPFR.html

https://www.barkly.com/2016-cybersecurity-playbook?utm_campaign=cbsib2b-101216-2016playbook&promo=99&rId=MjQ0MTA2MDI1NDg3NTUzOTAzMjgwOTU0OTE2MjE2ODc%3D

http://www.rdmag.com/?et_cid=5610443&et_rid=651557773&linkid=http%3a%2f%2fwww.rdmag.com%2f

http://www.photonics.com/Splash.aspx?PID=20&refer=IPL&utm_source=IPL_2016_10_12&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=IPL

http://www.industrytap.com

October 10th

Work on your patent drawings by hand, making any section (cutaway) views that you think will be necessary.  

Keep notes in your weekly journal, with any changes you see may be needed in the product, as well as any possible spin-off products that occur to you.  Also be aware of other inventions that you would like to develop within the school year.